Banning e-cigarette adverts could cause the cigarette quit rate to drop by 3%, according to a study carried out in the US.

Conducted by researchers from Bentley University, the Graduate Center of the City University in New York, Cornell University and the National Bureau of Economic Research, the study found that e-cig commercials are dwarfed by nearly four times in comparison to other nicotine replacement therapies.

If more smokers saw e-cigarette ads, more smokers would quit, according to the research published at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

In the UK, Public Health England threw their weight behind e-cigarettes for the first time in the annual Stoptober campaign, the month of October where smokers are encouraged to kick their habits.

With 25,000 participants, the study assessed smoking habits, efforts to quit, smoking cessation methods used and their success.

It concluded by saying that tobacco quitting rates would reduce by 3% if all e-cig TV adverts in the US were pulled, equating to approximately 105,000 more smokers.

The authors also believe that if the Food and Drug Administration weren’t considering regulations to limit e-cigarette manufacturers, the industry would have amassed a similar quantity of e-cigs ads as nicotine replacement therapies.