A study into e-cigarette use in the European Union has found that non-smokers rarely vape and 67% of smokers who do either quit or smoke less normal cigarettes.

E-cig researcher Dr. Konstantinos Farsalinos of the University of Patras in Greece instigated the study, and surveyed 27,460 EU residents aged 16 and over. All 28 member states were represented.

The FDA chose not to wait this irrefutable evidence, and began its regulation of e-cigs in the US in May.

Dr Farsalinos, who regularly contributes to the journal Addiction, frequently absolves e-cigarettes, and has earned a strong reputation within the vaping community.

“E-cigarette use in the European Union appears to be largely confined to current or former smokers, while current use and nicotine use by people who have never smoked is rare,” researchers wrote.

Only 2.3% of the surveyed were described as non-smokers who currently use e-cigs, meaning it’s exceedingly rare that a non-smoker is drawn into e-cigs.

35.1% of current e-cig users confirmed that they had stopped smoking regular cigarettes. That’s more than a third of the study.

32.2% had reported that they are now smoking less thanks to e-cigarettes.

Using the results, researchers have calculated that by using e-cigs, up to 6.1 million EU citizens have quit smoking and 9.2 million have at least reduced their intake.

“These are probably the highest rates of smoking cessation and reduction ever observed in such a large population study,” said Farsalinos.

Studies in the UK have shown that e-cigs are helping thousands quit. Even doctors from the Royal College of Physicians have acknowledged the health benefits and recommended e-cigs to smokers.