A new study by the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine based on over 800 peer-reviewed studies on vaping health effects, e-cigs help adults quit smoking, but can encourage young people to smoke cigarettes.

Compiled after it was commissioned by the United States Congress aiming to determine whether e-cigs are safe or harmful, findings that indicate e-cigs help smokers quit may not come as a surprise to many.

Among the latest e-cigarette reports that have emerged recently includes a study that found that smoking cessation rates are helped by e-cigarettes.

Now, the new report from the US says that e-cigs, whilst addictive, have less numbers and lower levels of toxic substances than traditional tobacco cigarettes.

David Eaton, who chaired the committee, said that e-cigarettes are likely to be far less harmful than tobacco products.

The report states that there is “conclusive evidence” that swapping smoking for vaping exposes the user to less toxicants and carcinogens, and will “reduce short term adverse health outcomes in several organ systems”.

The report also found no evidence to link vaping with cancer, but accepted that “more and better research on e-cigarettes’ short- and long-term effects on health and on their relationship to conventional smoking is needed to answer that question with clarity.”

“In some circumstances, such as their use by non-smoking adolescents and young adults, their adverse effects clearly warrant concern.”