A scientific study has found that e-cigarette vapours carry no toxin threat to human lungs, strengthening the case for widespread e-cigarette use.

British American Tobacco funded the research which showed the vapours omitted from e-cigarettes could be as innocuous as fresh air.

“By employing a combination of a smoking robot and a lab-based test using respiratory tissue, it was possible to demonstrate…. the e-cigarette aerosols used in this study have no [toxic] effect on human airway tissue,” said BAT spokesperson Dr Marina Murphy.

Vaping has become a popular smoking cessation aid, with many Brits and vapers all over the world quitting smoking using e-cigarettes. However, vaping has an ambivalent reception among policy makers all over the world, with many reluctant to endorse or allow vaping for the purposes of quitting smoking.

Scientists constructed a “smoking robot” which carried lung cell replicas which were ruthlessly tested by tobacco smoke, e-cig vapours and fresh air.

The fake lung cells were quickly dismantled by the tobacco smoke, but were untroubled by vapours, and the damage was similar to the effect of air.

“Despite the limitations of the research, it adds additional evidence to support the contention that vaping is a lot safer than smoking,” said Dr Michael Siegel, professor in the department of community health sciences at Boston University’s school of public health.

“Such a phenomenon would result in the greatest public health miracle of our lifetimes,” explained Dr Siegel.

Siegel also called for public health bodies and anti-tobacco movements to help and encourage smokers to start vaping.

An e-cigarette expert told The Mirror  that the results were not surprising and believes that the research was accurate.

“While I’m sure that for many the source of the research will be a problem, of recent years the science conducted by the tobacco industry has been of very good quality, and despite the historic issues I wouldn’t view it with any greater scepticism than research conducted elsewhere,” said Tom Pruen, chief scientific officer of the Electronic Cigarette Industry Trade Association.