E-cigarette regulations can impact the effectiveness in vaping as a smoking cessation method, according to research published in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

From May 20, e-cigarette regulation courtesy of the European Union’s Tobacco Products Directive will be formally implemented in the UK, making alterations to e-liquid nicotine content, e-liquid bottle sizes, tanks and more.

The study was a longitudinal cohort survey carried out between 2010 and 2014 in the US, UK, Canada and Australia, looking at over 1700 smokers. At the time of the survey, there was relatively little regulation in the UK and US and substantial regulation in the other two participants.

Looking into quit attempts and smoking cessation methods utilised, the study found that the countries with less regulation we’re more likely to quit cigarettes, with 73% attempts in the UK and US proving successful.

In Canada and Australia, only 32% of attempts were successful. This shows that regulation does damage the effectiveness of vaping as a smoking cessation tool.

It has previously been found that vaping doubles a smoker’s chances of quitting, and is the best method of quitting smoking, reiterating the notion that vaping is an effective smoking cessation method.

Dr. Hua-Hie Yong, lead author from the Cancer Council Victoria, said: “The benefits of ECs for smoking cessation may be limited to those who reside in an environment where there are few restrictions on the retail sale and marketing of ECs.”

“Developing an appropriate regulatory framework for ECs should be a priority so that the benefits of ECs for smoking cessation can be realised. Where the regulatory environment supports it, given the popularity of ECs, smokers who are unable or unwilling to quit using current approved methods should be offered the option of using ECs as short-term aids to quit smoking or replacing smoking with ECs for harm reduction purposes.”