The World Health Organisation has asked Britain to consider banning e-cigs and vaping products from public spaces such as schools, hospitals and public transport, just like tobacco.

Such a ban would effectively render e-cigs under the same conditions as tobacco, which has caused debate as numerous medical personnel has described e-cigs as a great method of smoking cessation.

The WHO says countries should consider a ban as ‘passive vaping’ has been linked to lung damage, heart complications and stillbirth in pregnant women.

It has also been reported that there is evidence e-cigarettes are linked to cancer and is a gateway to smoking tobacco.

However, all of these have been emphatically contradicted by numerous scientific studies. It has been found that there is ‘no second hand vaping’, as vaping does not harm bystanders.

Moreover, employers have been urged to allow vaping around the workplace to help smokers quit their addictions.

Another study has found that there are 95% less toxins in e-cigs than in regular tobacco.

“So far there is a clear understanding that e-cigarettes should be regulated,” said Dr Vera Luiza da Costa e Silva, head of the WHO convention secretariat, the organisation which is urging Britain to ban vaping from public spaces.

“They should not be promoted among young people and pregnant women and other specific groups. They should not be promoted widely – there should be restrictions and regulations.”

However, this isn’t likely to go down with UK health experts as British doctors are using e-cigs to help smokers quit, and numerous NHS hospitals have okayed vaping on their grounds. Most recently, NHS Tayside allowed vaping on the premises.

It has been found that vaping is helping thousands quit and e-cigs are widely recognised as the most effective method of smoking cessation.