Lord Martin Callanan, the Lord who launched a bid to save e-cigs from the Tobacco Products Directive, has called for the Government to use Brexit and save lives.

The former MEP argued in the House of Lords that the interests of Big Pharma should not dictate the UK’s smoking policy and they should use Brexit to promote e-cigs.

Lord Callanan has been an outspoken critic of the TPD’s inclusion of e-cigarettes, and believes it’s time for officials to listen to the facts regularly pointed out by health and medical personnel.

Speaking on Monday, Callanan slapped scurrilous reports from tabloid newspapers and “public health officials” that have said vaping is just as harmful as vaping, and said it’s time to back e-cigs and save lives.

Doctors recently recommended giving e-cigs to smokers looking to quit, and previously it has been found that e-cigarettes are 95% safer than regular tobacco.

Following Brexit, the status of the TPD is unclear. There are numerous theories and conclusions that have been devised, but it will likely be revealed once Article 50 has been triggered.

Right now, we’re still subject to the EU’s rules and regulations. The TPD had proposed a long list of changes for vapers.

“How have we ended up with this crazy state of affairs? The Department of Health prides itself on being a ‘global thought leader’ on tobacco, to use its words, and while the department has played a strong game on pure control measures, by which I mean the ban on public place smoking and the taxation of smoking, it has been little short of appalling on its approach to tobacco harm reduction, by which I refer to the development of much less harmful substitutes to smoking,” said Lord Callanan.

In 2013, Britain’s Chief Medical Officer singled out vaping as one of biggest health threats to the UK, along with obesity and binge drinking. Lord Callanan was not impressed.

“It would be funny if the issue were not so serious.”

Lord Callanan launched a bid to save e-cigarettes in May. Lord Forsyth, another Conservative, recently called the EU’s e-cig regulations “North Korean stuff”.