A Manhattan court has upheld last month’s decision to implement a city ban on e-cigarette use.

Now, New York vapers must follow the same rules as tobacco smokers as an appellate court determined on Thursday.

The decision follows various US locations in similarly banning e-cigs from public spaces.

E-cigs are currently a matter of contention in the US. Late last year, vaping was fiercely debated at a public forum, symbolising the divisiveness of e-cigs.

In 2014, vaping was banned from public spaces such as bars, bistros and beaches. However, Citizens Lobbying Against Smoker Harassment, a smokers’ rights group, quickly legally challenged it.

Now, the Manhattan court has decided to uphold last month’s judgment to ban e-cigarettes in the city in public spaces and workplaces.

The group argued that the ban violated the constitution by grouping vaping and smoking, insinuating that they’re the same thing.

And if you look at the scientific arguments, it certainly appears like there is some validity to the group’s argument.

A recent study found no e-cig DNA damage, unlike regular cigarettes that have been found to cause damage DNA.

A similar study has found that e-cig vapour doesn’t induce DNA mutations, like tobacco smoke.

A city Law Department spokesperson provided a statement expressing that city lawyers are happy the judges recognised “the amendment was not buried, unrelated legislation and the subject of the bill was clearly and transparently identified to the public during the legislative process.”