Prisoners of an Isle of Man prison could be allowed to vape in the future to combat smoking addictions and to protect health.

The Department of Home Affairs are seeking to implement a six-month e-cigarette trial in Tynwald this month in order to allow inmates at the Jurby facility to use disposable e-cigarettes.

The aim of the trial is to decrease the amount of inmates who smoke illicit material or misuse nicotine patches. The trial should also protect other inmates and staff from second-hand smoking.

Reportedly, £15,000 is spent every year on supplying nicotine patches to inmates, and the Government is hoping that the Isle of Man prison e-cig trial, funds will be saved.

The new scheme will outlaw nicotine patches, and prisoners will still be provided with help if they’re seeking to topple their nicotine addiction. The Isle of Man prison banned smoking in March 2008.

In February 2014, there was similar move in which some UK prisons launched an e-cig trial.

Other public spaces that now allow vaping includes several NHS hospitals, with NHS Tayside permitting the use of e-cigarettes on their grounds last year.

A recent study found that smoking is at a record low, with Britons turning to vaping as an alternative.