According to a new study carried out by the University of Michigan, the benefits of smokers using electronic cigarettes to help them quit can protect and help public health.

Spearheaded by researchers Kenneth Warner and David Mendez from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, they ran several simulations, one of which found that nearly 3.3 million life-years could be saved by 2070 if e-cigarettes were backed as a method of smoking cessation.

Warner insisted that young people must be reminded of the dangers of smoking as recent statistics have shown that smoking and vaping among teens has risen in the United States.

Warner said: “I don’t think this paper resolves the argument once and for all. But we have to go with the best evidence available. I believe the case is strong; the benefits outweigh the risks.”

“We are fortunate to know the risks of cigarette smoking, based on decades of epidemiological research. It could take years before we know the full health impact of vaping, if indeed we ever will.”

The report’s overall conclusion is that although all of the health risks posed by e-cigs are unclear, they are indeed less harmful that conventional cigarettes and can help smokers quit, thus can be beneficial to public health.

Their findings echo many health studies carried out by other academics and health experts, including highly notable sources, such as Public Health England.

The study also isn’t the first by a university to find similar results. An Indian University found that e-cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes in January.