Smokers in Yorkshire have been told that they can quit smoking with the help of e-cigarettes as part of a Cancer Research campaign in Yorkshire that was announced today.

The “Vape To Quit” campaign will encourage offices and workplaces to ban smoking on their grounds and instead install designated vaping areas to help workers kick their additions.

Health professionals that are urging cigarette smokers to ditch fags for e-cigarettes are backing the campaign, which will run parallel with National No Smoking Day.

Following the publication of Public Health England’s findings at the beginning of February, Yorkshire Cancer Research is pushing for e-cigarettes to be widely adopted by smokers in Yorkshire as it is safer and does not harm bystanders, according to PHE’s research.

Despite being a relatively new phenomenon, e-cigarettes have quickly emerged as the most popular smoking cessation aid for smokers.

A Study funded by Cancer Research has even called for vape shops to work with health experts to devise plans to help smokers quit by vaping.

As previously reported, Yorkshire has a higher smoking rate than any other county in England. With an estimated 750,000 smokers in the region, it is widely known that smoking is a common cause of cancer and is the leading cause of premature death in Yorkshire.

“We have reviewed the evidence and concluded that smokers should be encouraged to try vaping as a tool to quit smoking. E-cigarettes are not entirely risk-free, but when compared to tobacco cigarettes they are significantly safer – there is no question about it – and we know that they are effective in reducing smoking rates,” said Kathryn Scott, Chief Executive at Yorkshire Cancer Research.

“E-cigarettes are still quite new, and their long-term impact needs more research. But half of all long-term smokers will die as a result of their smoking if they don’t quit. Action needs to be taken now. We can’t afford to wait while the health of hundreds of thousands of people across Yorkshire continues to be harmed from tobacco smoke.”

Dr Scott revealed that UK smoke-free laws that prohibit cigarettes in enclosed public spaces do not cover vaping and that vaping is different to smoking, and should be treated differently.

“It is not acceptable to require vapers to share the same outdoor space as smokers, or to ban e-cigarette use. This could undermine an attempt to quit or make it more difficult for people to stay smoke-free. Vaping should be made a more convenient, as well as a safer option.”

“It is vital that healthcare professionals understand that vaping is an essential tool for improving the health of people living in our region. Negative coverage in the media has led to a misconception that vaping is dangerous, when the reality is that e-cigarettes have the potential to reduce the harm from tobacco caused to smokers, those around them and the wider society.”